Themeparks, movies and Disney fan. I'm a professional geek too.
25 stories
·
1 follower

Explain it, as you would to a child... #IPBill

1 Comment
Read the whole story
Share this story
Delete
1 public comment
tomm74
960 days ago
reply
Nice explanation as to what the government want to do with encrypted communications...
Cardiff

Oculus Rift collects user info and uses it to target ads, says report

1 Comment

You agree to this in the software installation terms and conditions.
Read the whole story
Share this story
Delete
1 public comment
tomm74
984 days ago
reply
What did people expect from Facebook!
Cardiff

Meet OnHub: a new router for a new way to Wi-Fi

7 Comments and 8 Shares
Ugh...not again. You get home at the end of the day, and sit down to stream a new movie or upload vacation photos — and your Wi-Fi slows to a crawl or just stops working. Instead of relaxing in front of the screen or sharing those photos with friends, you spend it unplugging and re-plugging cords, trying to decipher blinking lights, or contemplating a call to customer support.

While we count on Wi-Fi more than ever to be entertained, productive, and stay connected, we’re streaming and sharing in new ways our old routers were never built to handle. So today, with our partner TP-LINK, we’re launching OnHub, a different kind of router for a new way to Wi-Fi. Instead of headaches and spotty connections, OnHub gives you Wi-Fi that’s fast, secure, and easy to use.



Designed for the Home
Many of us keep our router on the floor and out of sight, where it doesn’t work as well. We replaced unruly cords and blinking lights with internal antennas and subtle, useful lighting, so you’ll be happy placing OnHub out in the open, where your router performs its best.

Starts Fast, Stays Fast
During setup, OnHub searches the airwaves and selects the best channel for the fastest connection. A unique antenna design and smart software keep working in the background, automatically adjusting OnHub to avoid interference and keep your network at peak performance. You can even prioritize a device, so that your most important activity — like streaming your favorite show — gets the fastest speed.

A simple mobile app
OnHub makes it simple to set up and manage your Wi-Fi, all from the Google On app, available on Android or iOS. The Google On app tells you how much bandwidth your devices are using, lets you run a network check, and if there’s an issue with your Wi-Fi, the app offers suggestions to help. And, instead of lost passwords and sticky notes, it even reveals your password with a single tap and lets you text or email it to friends.

Just gets better
OnHub automatically updates with new features and the latest security upgrades, without interrupting your connection. In the future, OnHub can support smart devices that you bring into your home, whether they use Bluetooth® Smart Ready, Weave, or 802.15.4. We also plan to design new OnHub devices with other hardware partners in the future. Stay tuned for news from our second partner, ASUS, later this year.

Starting today, OnHub is available for pre-order for $199.99 from online retailers in the U.S. including the Google Store, Amazon, and Walmart.com. It will be available for sale in retail stores in the U.S. and in Canada in the coming weeks.

At the end of the day, we want our Wi-Fi to just work, so that we can do all the things we love to do online. Here’s to Wi-Fi with the reliability, speed, and security you want at home, without the frustrations you don’t.

Read the whole story
Share this story
Delete
7 public comments
expatpaul
1213 days ago
reply
I saw this elsewhere, but it's worth repeating...

Just connect your Google router to your Google fiber connection and connect to it with your smartphone or laptop running a Google operating system and Google browser. Visit your Google home page (using Google's DNS servers, of course) to read your Google Mail, or perhaps catch up on the news with Google News, or use Google+ to see what your friends are up to, or get a little work done on Google Docs. Should you do some Google searches and end up on some non-Google sites, don't worry - you're still safe under the watchful eye of Google AdSense and Google Analytics. What have you got to be so paranoid about?
Belgium
jeterhere
1213 days ago
I just Googled your reply, your ok ...
expatpaul
1213 days ago
Heh
srsly
1212 days ago
Someday soon we will all be making the conscious choice, "do I want to have my complete information and records with one company, or do I want to have three or four companies have 70% of my information apiece?"
expatpaul
1212 days ago
@srsly: I really hope you're right but I don't see much evidence of this happening so far. Far too many people are far too happy to put all their data in the hands of a single company with no thought of the risks.
Courtney
1213 days ago
reply
I trust literally zero products Google makes anymore, I'm not about to hand them my physical router. Buyer Beware.
Portland, OR
tsuckow
1213 days ago
reply
But does it counter buffer bloat?
tomm74
1214 days ago
reply
I have to wonder how much data about browsing (and other connections) it'll be sending "home"...
Cardiff
skorgu
1214 days ago
reply
Can I put openwrt on it?
laza
1214 days ago
reply
This could be cool!
Belgrade, Serbia
Ferret
1214 days ago
reply
Anything that makes wifi easier and better.

It’s Time to End “Traditional Gay Marriage”

1 Share
One of the nuttier arguments against same-sex marriage — and there’s a hotly contested battle for that distinction — is that gay people already have the right to marry. If they want to, they can marry someone of the opposite … Continue reading
Read the whole story
Share this story
Delete

Bully My Son at Your Own Risk

1 Share
I knew when I walked into the house that something was wrong.

"Babe," my husband said, "your oldest needs some mom time."

I looked further into the house and saw my 10-year-old son sitting on the couch, arms crossed, huffing and looking at his lap.

"What's up?" I asked my husband.

He shrugged. "I have no idea. Go work your magic."

Even though my husband is a stay-at-home dad, I seem to have this special power over my sons. Or maybe it's just tenacity, because if one of them is upset, I will not stop until I get what's wrong out of them.

I snuggled up to my son and poked him in the side. "What going on, baby?" I asked.

He huffed.

"You don't want to talk about it?"

He shook his head and and looked away from me.

I sighed. "Yeah, kiddo, you know that's not how it works." I pried one of his arms away from his middle and held his hand in mine. "Do we need to go to the bathroom?"

In our house the bathroom is one of the few places available for a private conversation away from all the distractions. But today the bathroom would not be required.

"Stupid Michael!" my son yelled, naming a boy in his class.

"What about Michael?" I prodded.

"He was saying things about me being gay. He said it was illegal!"

My son, though just 10 years old, has been openly identifying as gay for over three years. And as awful as it is to say, I had been waiting for this moment. Before that day, my oldest son had never dealt with any anti-gay sentiment at school (though his younger brother had). But as the parent of a gay kid in middle America, I knew it was only a matter of time. We had tried to prepare him. We'd talked to him about the hate that is out there in the world. We'd told him that some people don't like gay people. We'd discussed different political candidates, etc., but it was never part of his day-to-day life -- until now.

I'd like to say that I had a cool and measured response to this kid saying being gay is illegal, but I would totally be lying. My first thought, the mother-honey-badger-with-rabies thought, was that I wanted to find this Michael kid and rip his arms off. Yes, that is totally unfair and unreasonable and un-a-lot-of-things, but there it was. I managed to be a grownup and stuff that reaction down.

"Why do you think he said that, baby?" I asked in my kindest, Mom-loves-you voice.

"He said his parents told him."

And now I wanted to find Michael's parents and rip their arms off.

I pulled my too-big kid onto my lap. (He's 5-foot-2 now, so this looks a little ridiculous, but I am unwilling to stop.) "Is being gay illegal?" I asked in my softest voice.

He shook his head.

"Some people believe things that aren't true," I continued. "Just because they believe them doesn't make them true. You know that, right?"

"Yes," he hissed at me.

I stroked his hair for a while, then lifted his chin to look at me. What I saw in his face wasn't at all what I expected. I expected tears. I expected sadness and shame. I saw none of that. Instead I saw anger -- red-cheeked and fierce-eyed anger. "What did you say back to him?" I asked and watched as his expression turned sheepish.

He wriggled uncomfortably. "Stuff I'm not supposed to say at school," he said. "Then he ran away."

It took everything in me not to laugh.

We talked for a while about better things things to say. We talked about going to his teacher and the principal right away if it happened again. We talked about the gay people we know, and how none of them are illegal either. I told him how awesome he is. He rolled his eyes at me and said, "I know." We went on with our evening, and after the boys were in bed, my husband I talked about what had happened. We were both more than a little shocked.

We all know how this script is supposed to go: Gay kid gets teased and bullied. Gay kid feels demeaned and ashamed. Gay kid maybe gets beaten up. Gay kid runs off to lick his wounds and feel horrible about himself. Gay kid feels alone.

But not this time. This time the gay kid, my gay kid, got pissed. He fought back. And the bully ran away. Then the gay kid, my gay kid, went home and talked to his parents about it.

And you know what? I'm glad he got angry. That's a damn sight better than ashamed. He should be angry, because no one has the right to tell my kid that something he is is wrong. There should be no place for shame, because he has nothing to be ashamed of. Sure, he shouldn't have said bad words. But when I think of all those other kids out there being bullied in their schools, with no supportive parents or teachers, those kids who are ashamed and dying inside because of what people tell them about who they are, I can think of a few not-cool-for-school words I want to throw their way myself.

Now my husband and I have to face some facts. Our kid has had an idealist experience so far when it comes to his orientation. That time is over. Reality is settling down on us, a reality that is not always fun or pretty, a reality where our kid will be defending himself from the Michaels of the world, who have been taught by their parents to hate instead of love. We can't always protect him, so he'll need to protect himself, no matter how much that makes my internal mother honey badger with rabies scream with rage. But he will never be alone, because he will always have us to come home to, to tell him the truth, to tell him he's awesome.

So far so good.

Read the whole story
Share this story
Delete

Here's Why Public Wifi is a Public Health Hazard

1 Share
Read the whole story
Share this story
Delete
Next Page of Stories